Help your child talk: Expand for your child

Trying to help your child expand from one word utterances, then add a word.  Sounds simple because it is.  Adding a word will provide your child with a model for how to combine words.   Your little one doesn’t have to repeat after you.  Listening is his only task.  But in time, you will hear longer phrases. Here are a few examples: Child says  “up”                    You say “pick up” Child says  “all gone”          You say “crackers all gone” Child says  “shoe”                You say “shoe off”

Hello, Animals! by Smriti Prasadam

Hello, reader! Hello, Animals! This board book has great black and white illustrations with shinny splashes.  The words are simple, repetitive lines:  “Hello, animal!”.  Each page also lists sounds related to the animal. This book is great for young children since they can say “hi” to all of the animals.  Kids also love naming the animals and imitating their sounds.  This will be a favorite!  

Happy Birthday from Melissa and Doug

Happy birthday to you! Happy birthday to you! Happy birthday from Melissa and Doug. Happy birthday to you!! Every day is a party with this delicious toy.  In fact, this is my most popular toy.  My clients request it again and again.  Each time we use it, we find new and creative ways to celebrate. I use this toy to work on making requests, describing, following directions, and asking and answering questions.  Children love to decorate, cut, and serve the cake.  What great verbs…don’t forget to work on those! Since all children love birthday parties, you will be using the toy for years to come.

Help your child talk: Talk about what your child is doing

Last month, I wrote about talking about what you are doing.  This week, let’s look at talking about what your child is doing. When you narrate what your child is doing, seeing, or feeling, he’ll learn the words to express himself better.  Just remember to repeat, repeat, repeat.  Use shorter sentences and phrases, too.  Then your child will be more likely to use your words as his own.

Help your child talk: Talk about what you are doing

You are busy.   You don’t have time to work on language.  Well, at least you think that you don’t.    But all that you need to do is talk! To help your child, talk out loud about what you are doing.  While washing the dishes, talk about the dirty cups, soap, washing, etc.  While doing the laundry, talk about putting the items in and out of the washer, folding, the warm or wet clothes, and smells of the detergent and fabric softener.  Hate making the bed, talk about your feelings and why you complete the chore anyway. Your child will learn valuable language by listening.  Hopefully soon, they can pitch in with the chores, too!

Where are Baby’s Easter Eggs? By Karen Katz

In this book, baby needs to find the Easter eggs. Your child needs to help!

Karen Katz brings us another great book for the Easter season: “Where are Baby’s Easter Eggs?” The repetitive lines of the story are great for teaching sentence structure, questions, yes and no responses, and spring vocabulary.

Help your child talk: Mix up a routine

Your child loves routines because it helps them know what to expect.  Use this love of routines to enhance your child’s communication. Set up a routine for play or a daily task.  During the routine, talk about what you and your child are doing.  Practice this routine, then mix it up. When you change the routine, your child will let you know his thoughts through words or gestures. Let’s look at the routine of hand washing. 1.  If you use a phrase over and over, don’t say the last word, then wait to see what your child does. 2.  Forget the soap. 3.  Give the child the towel before you wash hands. 4.  When your hands are dirty, act like you don’t know what to do. Then wait!  Your child will say or do something.  Of course, they will think you are silly!  It is so much fun to hear

Continue reading

Moo, Baa, La La La By: Sandra Boynton

Moo, Baa, La La La By: Sandra Boynton is fantastic.  In fact, I LOVE this book!  Kids love it, too. It is one of the books that I always take to my first therapy sessions.  Yes, it is simple.  That is what makes it great!  It promotes interaction.  It allows the child to “read” with you by saying the animal sounds.  It is a great way to work on turn taking. I like to use it with early communicators.  The animal sounds are easier than words.  Children want to read it over and over.  They experience success and get a lot of practice. Pick up a copy.  I bet it will become a favorite.

What are blocked and random practice?

Blocked and random practice are terms used in apraxia therapy.  Here is a quick explanation of these practice types. Blocked practice is repeating the same word again and again.  This is best to establish a new motor pattern. Random practice is saying different words.  This supports retention and transfer of a motor plan.

Help your child talk: Don’t anticipate your child’s needs

What?  Don’t anticipate my child’s needs? You are a great parent and do a fantastic job of meeting your child’s needs.  That begs the question, “do you anticipate your child’s needs too often?”  If you do, you may limit the chances your child has to tell you, in words or gestures, what he needs. If your child always gets what he needs, he won’t have any reason to express his desires.  He can just sit there and get a drink.  Why would he point to his cup  or say “water”? To help your young child use his words more, don’t anticipate his needs.  Forget to give him a spoon, don’t open the bubbles, or give him an empty cup.  Wait and see how much your child wants to say.  He’ll tell you what he wants.

© 2017 Tarle Speech & Language. All rights reserved.